The Adventures of Lionheart, Temple Cat – Timelines, Ancestors and Clans

A recent trip to Scotland uncovered previously unknown ancestors in the land of heather, thistle and Highlands cows.
       McLionheart, Chieftan of the cat clan
There in the history books of cat clans was none other than McLionheart, distantly related to the great Scottish hero Sir William Wallace, known as Braveheart from  the 13th century.
 
Throughout Scottish history the gathering of family, friends and neighbors was a way of protecting from invaders like the ever colonizing English and the seafaring Norse traders.  This became the origin of the clan system. In Gaelic, clan means “children” or progeny linking families, cats and dogs together whether related or not.  The role of the designated Chieftan was as a symbolic father and trustee for the families and community.

The relationship between the clan and their chosen chief carried a deep bond of loyalty and trust and gaves a sense of roots or belonging which is the essence and spirit of the clan.

 

According to the stories, Chieftan McLionheart had a great protector and right
McJackson, the chief’s assistant and protector
hand  in man’s best friend, a “dug” called McJackson who took his job very seriously. Wearing his clan tam’o shanter proudly, he guarded and barked in the presence of strangers and visitors until they passed his examination by sniffing. His free time was spent honing his hunting skills, by chasing rabbits and digging for gophers and badgers.
 
The McLionheart tale would not be complete without acknowledging the wee Lady Xena, a first cousin known for her keenly sharpened claws,

A portrait of cat royalty

gentle brogue of a purr and high fashion. In a place like Scotland that is known for raining on a regular basis, like all the time and a wind to boot, knowing how to dress in a blanket with a matching hat is highly sought after skill.

The curious part of the McLionheart clan is how generations can repeat themselves. As a wise proverb says…the apple doesn’t fall far from the ancestral tree.